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Mathematics II

MODULE HANDBOOK

(1)    GENERAL INFORMATION

SCHOOL

SCHOOL OF ECONOMIC AND MANAGEMENT STUDIES

DEPARTMENT

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATIONS

LEVEL OF STUDY (BSc/MSc)

BSc

COURSE CODE

304

SEMESTER

3rd

COURSE TITLE

Mathematics II

INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES
in case the credits are awarded in separate parts of the course e.g. Lectures, Laboratory Exercises, etc. If the credits are awarded uniformly for the whole course, indicate the weekly teaching hours and the total number of credits.

WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS

CREDIT UNITS

4

5

 

 

Add rows if needed. The teaching organization and teaching methods used are described in detail in (d).

COURSE TYPE

general background, special background, general knowledge specialization, skills development

PREREQUISITE COURSES:

 

103 Mathematics I

LANGUAGE OF TEACHING and EXAMS:

Greek – English

IS THE COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS

Yes

ELECTRONIC COURSE PAGE (URL)

(2)    LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of this course, knowledge and skills that will be gained, and abilities of an appropriate level that students will acquire after the successful completion of the course.

Refer to Appendix A.

  • Description of the Level of Learning Outcomes for each course of study according to the Qualifications Framework of the European Higher Education Area
  • Descriptive Indicators of Levels 6, 7 & 8 of the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning and Annex B
  • Summary Guide for writing Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes for this course, upon successful completion, include the ability to:

1) understand and use combinatorial analysis, 2) understand the rate of change of functions and the core principles behind differential calculus with more than one variable (including applications), 3) understand total and partial derivatives of variables with more than one variable,  4) utilize the minima and maxima concepts learned to model and solve some practical business problems, including problems in business finance, economics and operations management and 7) understand and utilize the basic elements of integration calculus and applications.

 

 

 

General Skills

Taking into account the general skills that the graduate must have acquired (as they are listed in the Diploma Supplement and are listed below) which of the following is the aim of the course ?

Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information, using the necessary technologies

Adaptation to new situations

Decision making

Autonomous work

Teamwork

Working in an international environment

Work in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas 

Project design and management

Respect for diversity and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Demonstration of social, professional and moral responsibility and sensitivity in gender issues

Exercise criticism and self-criticism

Promoting free, creative and inductive thinking

……

Other…

…….

The skills  that the graduates must have acquired, upon successful completion of this course are:

Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information, using the necessary technologies

Adaptation to new situations

Decision making

Autonomous work

Teamwork

Respect for diversity and multiculturalism

Respect for the natural environment

Demonstration of social, professional and moral responsibility and sensitivity in gender issues

Exercise criticism and self-criticism

Promoting free, creative and inductive thinking

(3)    COURSE CONTENT

The course consists of: Combinatorial Analysis (Basic Principles of Counting, Permutations, Repetitive Permutations, Circular Permutations, Combinations, Repeated Combinations), Relationships and function (functions of two or more independent variables - definition, Derivative of functions with more than one variable, Rules of differentiation, Partial derivative of functions of two or more variables, applications in Comparative Static Analysis, Differentials, Derivatives of complex functions), Optimization, Relative maxima and minima of functions of two variables, Second derivative criterion (Hessian determinant), Relatively maxima and minima with isotonic constraints (Lagrange multiplier method), basic elements of integral calculus.

 

 

 

 

(4)    TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS - EVALUATION

TEACHING METHOD
Face to face, distance learning, etc..

Face to face, use of e-class platform

USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES
Use of ICT in Teaching, in Laboratory Education, in Communication with students

For some cases use of MS-Excel in order to solve problems

TEACHING ORGANIZATION

The teaching methodologies are described in detail.

Lectures, Seminars, Laboratory Exercise, Field Exercise, Bibliography study & analysis, Tutoring, Internship (Placement), Clinical Exercise, Art Workshop, Interactive teaching, Study visits, Study work, artwork, creatio, etc

 

Indicate the student's study hours for each learning activity as well as the non-guided study hours according to the ECTS principles

Activity

Semester Workload

Lectures

13

Practical Exercise

26

Publications study

40

Assignments

40

Exams’ Preparation

40

Final Examination

2

Course Total  Effort

161

STUDENT EVALUATION

Description of the evaluation process

 

Assessment Language, Assessment Methods, Formative or Concluding, Multiple Choice Test, Short Answer Questions, Essay Development Questions, Problem Solving, Written Assignment, Report / Report, Oral Examination, Public Presentation, Public Presentation, Others

 

Explicitly defined assessment criteria are stated and if and where they are accessible to students.

Assessment Language: Greek (and in Erasmus+ case English) Assessment Methods: 2 hours written exams (30% Multiple Choice Test and/or Short Answer Questions plus 70% Problem Solving).

Logical correctness (10%) – Clarity (20%) – Starting point (20%) – Statement of conclusion (20%) – Reasoning (20%) – Over all evaluation (10%)

(5)    BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bradley, T. (2013). Essential mathematics for economics and business. John Wiley & Sons.

Chiang, C. A., & Wainwright, K. (2005). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. Mcgraw. Hill International.

Curwin J. and R. Slater (2002) Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions (5th ed), Singapore: Thomson Learning.

Jacques I. (1995) Mathematics for Economics and Business (2nd ed), Essex: Addison-Wesley Ltd.

Harris D.J. (1985) Mathematics for Business, Management and Economics: A Systems Modeling Approach, Sussex: Ellis Horwood Ltd.

Sydsaeter, K., Hammond, P., Strom, A., & Carvajal, A. (2021). Essential mathematics for economic analysis, 6th edition, Pearson Education.